Is Clean Beauty Really Better? 7 Derms & Aestheticians Weigh In

Skin

These doctors have voiced how important clean skin care is, but the recommendations they make (about thoer own skincare lines) are WAY OFF BASE!  Many of these products include toxic ingredients such as butylene glycol, Sodium Hyaluronate, Glycerin, etc.  Even products labeled natural or even organic contains these 3 ingredients which wreak havoc on the skin. Every skincare product they recommend (which they sell) are devoid of toxic ingredients. The last one list doesn’t give an igredient list on their pages that sell the product!

Scan almost any clean beauty retailer’s “About” page — Detox Market, Credo, Follain, Beautycounter — and you’ll notice two keywords: health and safety. That’s because the movement’s overarching mission is to eliminate chemicals ,known to be toxic to the human body from personal care products, including suspected cancer-causing agents (formaldehyde releasers, parabens) and hormone disruptors (phthalates, pesticides). While that’s no doubt a win for overall wellness, it does leave one critical question unanswered: Is clean beauty better for your skin? These seven dermatologists, cosmetic chemists, and renowned aestheticians think so.

“From my unique vantage point as a facialist for the past 25 years, having treated over 25,000 faces, I have seen how the proliferation of harsh ingredients — including dimethicone, fragrance, colorants, and sulfates — compromise the skin’s lipid barrier, thereby sensitizing the skin,” Angela Caglia, a celebrity aesthetician who works with Barbra Streisand and Minnie Driver, tells The Zoe Report. The integrity of the skin barrier is also a sticking point for cosmetic scientist Dr. Shuting Hu, Ph.D., who works with clean beauty brand Acaderma. “I personally believe in using clean ingredients as it is the very best way to prevent skin irritation and skin barrier damages, both of which are better for skin health,” Dr. Hu tells TZR. “Not only is it my belief, it is also scientifically proven.”

There’s a catch, though: Terms like “clean,” “natural,” “green,” and “non-toxic” aren’t regulated by the FDA — so, in theory, any brand can market any ingredient as clean (although the threat of callout culture tends to keep companies in line). “We really need a good working definition for ‘clean’ and ‘non-toxic,’” Marie Veronique Nadeau, a chemist and founder of her namesake skincare line, tells The Zoe Report. She personally considers an ingredient clean when it has “a track record for safety and efficacy” via scientific studies — and that goes for both naturals and synthetics. “It just makes more sense to use ingredients that are safe in your own opinion,” she says.

Ahead, seven skincare experts explain why they believe clean beauty is the healthiest choice for your skin — and reveal the natural and non-toxic products they swear by.

Dr. Nava Greenfield, Board-Certified Dermatologist

You need to be just as careful about what you put on your skin as what you eat and drink,” Dr. Nava Greenfield, M.D., a board-certified dermatologist, tells TZR. “Numerous studies have confirmed that products used topically on the skin penetrate into the bloodstream and affect your body.” She suggests cross-checking your products with the Environmental Working Group’s toxicity database to pinpoint any potentially harmful ingredients.

 

Marie Veronique Nadeau, Chemist & Brand Founder

“Absolutely, ‘clean’ and ‘non-toxic’ ingredients are better for the health of the skin,” Nadeau says. When it comes to formulating her own products, Nadeau adds a third descriptor to the list: active. “It’s not enough that it won’t harm you — people also need to be asking, ‘Is it active? Is it going to be doing something for my skin?’”

To this end, she recommends incorporating clean versions of vitamin C and vitamin B3 — aka, niacinamide — into your routine. “You need vitamin C to build collagen, and it also does any number of other cool things like limit hyperpigmentation and provide UV protection,” Nadeau says. “Vitamin B3 protects mitochondrial DNA from free radical damage. This is about as close as we’re going to get to slowing the aging process in the skin, so it’s a must-have for anyone interested in keeping skin healthy and youthful-looking.”

 

Britta Plug, Aesthetician & Brand Founder

“I avoid processed food and chemicals — I feel my best that way — and I apply the same reasoning to my skincare,” Britta Plug, a holistic aesthetician and co-founder of Wildling, tells The Zoe Report. According to Plug (and science), harsh chemicals can negatively impact the skin’s microbiome and disrupt its inherent functions. “Natural products are much more likely to support the skin’s innate intelligence, and support all of its functions, flora, and barrier system,” she says.

Her go-to products, naturally, come from her own line. “I’m obsessed with the sweet fern in our Empress Tonic,” Plug says. “It’s amazing for kickstarting detoxification by stimulating lymphatic flow, and it’s also great for skin irritations.” After spritzing with the Tonic, she reaches for Wildling’s Empress Oil. “The balm of gilead in the oil is pure magic for stimulating circulation and reducing fine lines and breakouts,” the aesthetician explains. “It also smells like a dreamy forest.”

 

Dr. Shuting Hu, Cosmetic Scientist

Dr. Hu is passionate about clean skincare — but emphasizes that clean doesn’t always mean natural. “Plenty of natural ingredients are irritating, and not all natural materials are made equally,” she says. “Some high quality synthesized ingredients are also clean, like vitamin C.”

In her work with Acaderma, Dr. Hu defines “clean” as any ingredient that minimizes irritation to the skin while maintaining efficacy. Her favorite? “Seh-Haw EXTM,” a brand-exclusive form of African kinkeliba extract that moisturizes dehydrated skin and boosts the barrier. “We spent two years optimizing the extraction and purification process of Seh-Haw EXTM to make sure no organic solvents were used in the whole process, and that there were no causes of pollution to the environment,” she says.

 

Angela Caglia, Celebrity Aesthetician & Brand Founder

 

@angelacagliaskincare

“Through a process of trial and error in my treatment room, I’ve discovered which ingredients work and which ingredients make skin more susceptible to external aging factors,” Caglia says. (Considering her clients include age-defying celebs like Helena Christensen, I totally trust her.)

“One ingredient, in particular, that I’ve discovered helps with maintaining homeostasis is the organically-grown Limnanthes alba flower, indigenous to the Pacific Northwest, from which meadowfoam seed oil is derived through a unique cold pressing process,” she shares. “The reason why I love it is that it’s similar in molecular structure to our own sebum, which means it’s able to deeply penetrate the skin’s surface to deliver high levels of essential fatty acids and antioxidants where they’re needed most.” It can be found throughout the aesthetician’s namesake skincare line.

 

Athena Hewett, Aesthetician & Brand Founder

“Like much of the population, I have sensitive skin,” Athena Hewett, an aesthetician and founder of skincare brand Monastery, tells The Zoe Report. When she discovered that even hypoallergenic ingredients were irritating her skin, she decided to launch her own company — where she’s redefined “non-toxic” as “100 percent natural.”

“Take propylene glycol, for example — this chemical is used to make polyester, is considered non-toxic, and is found in nearly all of the skincare products out today,” she says. “I am highly allergic to this ingredient as are many of my clients, but most of them have no idea that this is what has been wrong with their skin. When someone lays on my table and I notice dermatitis, I can almost guarantee that they are putting propylene glycol on their skin in some form or another. Sadly, this ingredient is just one of many.” Hewett now looks to naturals for safe — and sensitivity-friendly — skincare solutions. “I love watching what raspberry seed oil does to the skin,” she says. “It makes up our Gold Oil, and it immediately soothes and reduces redness.”

Sarah Akram, Aesthetician

“I am a believer in integrative skincare, meaning just like what you put inside of your body, what you put on its surface can make a big difference in how you look and feel,” Sarah Akram, a Washington D.C.-based aesthetician and the founder of her namesake skincare boutique, tells TZR. “Just like you’d drink a cold pressed juice for optimum nutrient intake, you should take a similar approach to your skincare routine and overall skin health.”

She suggests looking for products packed with pure, natural ingredients (i.e., not “naturally-derived” — which is basically a synonym for “synthetic”). The facialists’ top pick? The Antioxidant Defence Creme by Environ. “This moisturizer is loaded with antioxidants like vitamin C and E to strengthen skin cells and fight free radicals,” Akram says. “Antioxidants are so important in the fight against premature aging, they actually work with your SPF to protect and correct the effects of harmful UV rays.” And, of course, they’re abundant in nature.


Vitamin C Serum- DIY

Vitamin C Serum

DIY Vitamin CPhoto by Christin Hume on Unsplash

Make every 10 days

1 Tablespoon Aloe gel – organic gel from the health food store

! Teaspoon rose water/Witch hazel toner/ green tea extract- I make this myself.

1 teaspoon Vitamin C (I use Resurrection Beauty L-Ascorbic acid Fine Granular Powder (available on Amazon)

¼ dropper lactic acid (L. D. Carlson Lactic acid 88% (available on Amazon)

½ teaspoon ferulic acid powder – Nature and Nurture’s Ferulic Acid Powder (available on Amazon)

1/3 teaspoon papaya powder- optional

1. Slightly warm toner, not above 115 degrees and dissolve powders.

2. Add other ingredients and shake vigorously. Keep in dark bottle in the fridge and apply after washing your face, before moisturizer.


Four Words From Dermatologists That’ll Change Your Life: Stop Showering Every Day

ShowerPhoto by Chandler Cruttenden on Unsplash

by Rachel Lapidos on wellandgood.com

I used to really like showering. I’d linger beneath the spout and luxuriate in the hot water, which helped wake me up in the morning and/or release all my body’s tension after a really long day. These moments let my mind come up with all sorts of creative ideas that only occur when you’re washing your body. These days, though? I’m over it.

Showering’s annoying. It’s just a whole ordeal. And guess what? Dermatologists back me up on this.  You have expert-approved permission not to shower every single day. “It doesn’t matter what time of year it is—your entire body does not need to be washed daily,” says Rachel Nazarian, MD, board-certified dermatologist with Schweiger Dermatology. Controversial opinion maybe, but she’s got backup—dermatologist Mona Gohara, MD, star of Well+Good’s Dear Derm video series, says “you’re fine to skip a shower day or two.”   “Your entire body does not need to be washed daily.” —Rachel Nazarian, MD

Before you go carefree frolicking about while allowing your tub to collect dust—you still have to tend to the particularly pungent parts of your body so that you keep all of your friends. “All you need to do is clean the smelly parts,” says Dr. Gohara. The parts in question are the usual suspects: your pits, your groin, and your feet, which Dr. Nazarian says harbor more bacteria than other areas. “I recommend those areas be washed daily with a gentle cleanser since they’re really the primary areas that should be considered ‘dirty,’” she says.

And fun fact: You can skip the body wash if you’re washing your hair. “Shampoo will actually wash the rest of your body passively—there’s no need to take soap and specifically wash your arms, your legs, or your trunk,” says Dr. Nazarian, who adds that using more soap on those areas will actually strip your skin’s natural oils and dry them out.

“It’s certainly part of our culture to over-clean,” she says. You may be wondering: What if I do a sweaty workout, though? “Working out or going to the gym doesn’t actually change this,” says Dr. Nazarian. “Sweating doesn’t make you dirty.” Just stick with cleaning those three bacteria-prone areas of your body, and you’re good to go. (The only sporty scenario where she actually advises more cleansing is if you’re doing something like wrestling or MMA, where you have skin-to-skin contact with others.) So, there have it—showering is overrated.

Read more on the latest wellness trends at Well+Good


Yes, You Should Be Double Cleansing for Skin

Double cleansing is a method of cleansing your face twice: First, with an oil-based cleanser and again with a water-based cleanser. It can help remove stubborn, pore-clogging and acne-causing impurities that can remain on the skin even after washing your face once. Otherwise you are mixing make-up with dirt and dust (or other environmental  impurities) and then rinsing. But you can’t get the skin clean with that method, you are simply rubbing in the dirt. It’s like trying to clean dishes with dirty water.

The benefit of double cleansing is that the first cleanser will break down any makeup, remove dirt and excess oils from the day and clean your skin. The second cleanser will address your particular skin type or concern and should have ingredients to hydrate, smooth or exfoliate and treat acne. Doing both steps will assure that any treatment and moisturizing is not done in vain.

This method leaves the skin truly clean. The second cleanser can then gently remove the oil without stripping the skin and drying it out. While this is important at any age, it is crucial for dry or mature skin!

The products I use are ;

Nourish Organic Moisturizing Face Cleanser, Watercress & Cucumber, 6 Ounce

Nourish Organic Moisturizing Face Cleanser, Watercress & Cucumber available on Amazon

I use this at night after oil cleansing. I make my own oil cleanser using jojoba oil, sea buckthorn oil, MCT oil,  squalane, with powdered seaweed and a small amount of papaya enzyme.

In the morning, since I am not removing make-up, I use my own cleanser that I make and sell. It is honey and oil based with baking soda, available here.


Glycerin and Silicones in Skin Care and My Skin Care Regimen.

image

For years I have made many of my own skin care products; dry oils for oil cleaning my face, Honey-Baking Soda Cleanser. Recently I had an allergic reaction to a new, supposedly all natural, product. However the first ingredient was butylene glycol. My whole neck was blistered the day after using it, and quickly peeled and dried out.  I avoided got it calmed down with fresh aloe and in about 4 days it was was way better. A week later I used a product that had a small amount of propylene glycol. Remember these ingredients were in organic products. So I realized what was causing it and began eliminating those products from my skin care.

I then used a very mild product that had glycerin, and while I didn’t break out I did itch on my neck for a few days. Now, glycerin is a very rare allergen, but it did annoy my skin.

So I began looking for organic products that really were clean.  I learned that almost every skin care products that was listed as organic and all natural had these ingredients! 

Butylene glycol is basically anti-freeze. These type of products are used a humectants and as solvents. Because they are solvents, manufacturers of beauty products use them to help their products be absorbed in to our skin. And they are humectants, but remember humectants draw water from their surroundings, as WELL AS FROM OUR SKIN! They feel luxurious when we first put them on our skin, they give the product that “slip” that make them go on smoothly. But within about a half an hour we notice our skin feels dry. So put on more. And these products do nothing to actually nourish our skin, they just sit on the surface. The same as silicones do.

However you do not have to make your own products!  There are many product lines out there that do a great job and are truly clean. Just because a label says “all natural” or “organic” that does not mean that they are good for your skin or do not have ingredients that will  irritate your skin.

I have stopped using any product with glycerin, however it is hard to find products without it!  HERE is a great article on why you should avoid glycerin.

Here is my daily routine-

AM-  Cleanser- I use one that I make myself from honey, baking soda, almond oil, geranium oil, sea buckthorn oil, lavender oil,willow bark (calming and healing for skin).

You can buy it hereSkin Cleanser.

In the morning I use a product from Evan’s Garden called Crème’ Rose. I have been using this for about 15 years.

I then use Amazonian Clay Facial Powder, I then use Peter Thomas Roth powder Sunscreen.

I also use  Zuzu Cosmetics lipsticks, Jane Iredale Mascara, Zuzu eye shadows, and Iniki Organic Eyeliner.

Evening Skin Care- I oil cleanse to take off makeup by using a blend of dry oils- sea buckthorn oil, grape seed oil, squalane, jojoba oil. I massage it in for a few minutes and then wipe off with cotton balls, then wipe gently with a warm washcloth. I then use a cream cleanser called Nourish Organic Moisturizing Face Cleanser, Watercress & Cucumber, then rinse really well. I then use a toner made with willow bark, calendula, rose water and aloe. I make it myself every few weeks.  I mix Vitamin C powder with my moisturizer for daytime use.

I then use Retin-A, prescription strength, and have been using it since I was 38 years old. I am now 66. Here is what my skin looks like!

laughing 1

I wait about 15 minutes after applying it and then use moisturizer- at night I use Golden Phae Restorative Day and Night Moisturizer. I also use their Eye Cream on my eyes and neck.

Once a week I use a mask that I make myself, it contains Matcha tea, red seaweed powder, papaya enzyme and rice powder.

Of course, the BEST skin care comes from within, making sure our gut biome is healthy, eating lots of fruits and veggies, eliminating fast food and processed foods, eating a moderate amount of proteins (eggs in the morning, fruits and veggies all day, more fruits and veggies with a salad and sweet potatoes at night and about 5 ounces of seafood ,preferably cold water fish).  Avoid sugar, drink no cold drinks, drink a moderate amount of water. No grains or dairy. That’s it, it’s that simple.


Skin Care- Anti-Aging Skin Care, How To’s and Product Recommendations

I began studying skin care in my teens. I was interested in how to treat my teenage acne and the science of skin care. In my early twenties I read about a company called Redken, and though their products were not available widely I liked what they had to say about maintaining the PH of the skin and not stripping it of it’s natural oils. At that time there was very little info on the science of skin care, even less on how to care for our skin naturally.

Redken came out in the early 70’s with their PH  balanced mild bar of soap for your face. Their advice to help not strip our skin of it’s natural oils was to rinse our face in the water we had washed with, as it contained oils from our skin. This did not make sense to me, I wanted my facial skin clean, not rinsed in washing water. SO I began studying skin care, looking for mild products that were effective. I tried Kiss My Face soap, it was too strong, made my face tight and dry. And even though my skin was oily it made it oilier. I tried and couldn’t find anything I was happy with. I ended up using Clinique and Lancôme for a while, and while they were effective I didn’t like all of the chemicals. My sister gave  e a book on making my own beauty products and I was off to the races!  I learned to make soap, I made them with olive oil and used Apple Cider vinegar as a toner. Still just ok. Slowly more and more products were coming out that were organic. Skin care, along with makeup, that was available in health food stores were clean, but not very good. They were too oily, too heavy. I discovered it when I was pregnant with my daughter, Rachel and used it exclusively while I was pregnant. It was the first mineral make-up I ever found.

Skip forward to 1996 and my daughter Rachel was going to school to become an esthetician. We saw the first articles about the link between breast cancer and Parabans. Even the health food store brands had this ingredients and they began scrambling to reformulate. I could not find a cleanser that didn’t have it. At this point I had been using Cetaphil cleanser for a long time because it was very mild. But it wasn’t strong enough to remove makeup well. SO I decided to formulate a cleanser myself. For months I studied formulating (it’s not such a stretch form being a Chef!) I started by studying ingredients. This was the cleanser I made and I have been using it ever since. It has honey as it’s main ingredient, with baking soda as an exfoliator, a very small amount of Dr. Bonner’s soap, almond oil, geranium oil, evening primrose oil and water.  I still used it until last year, when it became a little strong for me, so I reformulated it without the baking soda. I have been using Retin-A since I was forty years old and found as I aged my skin was more sensitive and was dryer.

That Honey Cleanser is available- Honey Cleanser

About this same time mineral makeup burst on the scene and I discovered Jane Iredale. Pricy but amazing quality. I also discovered Evan’s Garden. They are a small Company in Clearwater, FL that makes small batch skin care and make-up. I LOVE her Skincare for Mature Skin. I have used her Crème Rose for day and Ma Juennesse for night as moisturizers ever since!

This new blog topic is going to cover the science of skin care, with a focus on organic products, and I mean truly natural and organic…not the stuff full of glycerin and  silicones that are out there today claiming to be all natural. I will review and cover makeup as well as skin care products and I will share my skin care regimen as well as the makeup I use. We will talk about why silicone sand glycerin are horrible for our skin, and the right was to cleanse, exfoliate, moisturize and nourish as well as how to protect our skin.

It is imperative to not just cleanse our skin with clean ingredients but to truly nourish our skin. Of course the best thing we can do for our skin is be healthy, active and well nourished. We will cover what foods to avoid for great skin, how to combat the things that ages our skin, and how to care for it as we age.

My first blog post will be about the dangers of glycerin and silicones, how to avoid them and the products I use that do not have them.

#skincare, #naturalskincare, #organicskincare, #JacksonvilleFL, #beyondpaleo, #meal deliveryservice


High Glycemic Index Foods and Dairy Products Linked to Acne

This article shows studies that high carbs and dairy intake cause acne, but those dietary practices also lead to obesity, poor health, a compromised immune system, and malnutrition.

Feb. 20, 2013 — A study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has determined that there is increasing evidence of a connection between diet and acne, particularly from high glycemic load diets and dairy products, and that medical nutrition therapy (MNT) can play an important role in acne treatment.

17 million Americans suffer from acne, mostly during their adolescent and young adult years. Acne influences quality of life, including social withdrawal, anxiety, and depression, making treatment essential. Since the late 1800s, research has linked diet to this common disease, identifying chocolate, sugar, and fat as particular culprits, but beginning in the 1960s, studies disassociated diet from the development of acne.
"This change occurred largely because of the results of two important research studies that are repeatedly cited in the literature and popular culture as evidence to refute the association between diet and acne," says Jennifer Burris, MS, RD, of the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, New York University. "More recently, dermatologists and registered dietitians have revisited the diet-acne relationship and become increasingly interested in the role of medical nutritional therapy in acne treatment."

Burris and colleagues, William Rietkerk, Department of Dermatology, New York Medical College, and Kathleen Woolf, of New York University’s Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, conducted a literature review to evaluate evidence for the diet-acne connection during three distinctive time periods: early history, the rise of the diet-acne myth, and recent research.

Culling information from studies between 1960 and 2012 that investigated diet and acne, investigators compiled data for a number of study characteristics, including reference, design, participants, intervention method, primary outcome, results and conclusions, covariate considerations, and limitations.

They concluded that a high glycemic index/glycemic load diet and frequent dairy consumption are the leading factors in establishing the link between diet and acne. They also note that although research results from studies conducted over the last 10 years do not demonstrate that diet causes acne, it may influence or aggravate it.
The study team recommends that dermatologists and registered dietitians work collaboratively to design and conduct quality research. "This research is necessary to fully elucidate preliminary results, determine the proposed underlying mechanisms linking diet and acne, and develop potential dietary interventions for acne treatment," says Burris. "The medical community should not dismiss the possibility of diet therapy as an adjunct treatment for acne. At this time, the best approach is to address each acne patient individually, carefully considering the possibility of dietary counseling."