GIR Reusable Face Masks- the only mask I wear anymore!

GIR Mask 2

GIR Reusable Face Mask

My GIR mask is now the only one I wear!   They run a tad small and I ordered a medium, which fits me perfectly. BUT they run small! 

All of you who follow my blog know that I very rarely endorse products. However I have to share this!  We are 11 months in to the pandemic and I now have a fabulous collection of masks. But wearing glasses with them is tricky and so is he fact that every single mask has to be modified because my face and especially my nose is SO tiny.  I wear children’s glasses and my nose width at the tip of my nose is only 1/2 an inch wide.  I have long been a fan of GIR kitchen utensils. As a Chef and an environmentalist I do not use plastic and love the well designed silicone utensils.

And then when the epidemic started they added a mask to their repertoire. HOLY COW, it is perfect!  The silicone seals the mask around my face, the ear straps are perfect and the  cleaning is a cinch. Just wash with soap and hot water and you are set to go. All of my cloth masks are wearing out at this point, this solves that problem. My glasses do not fog up because no moist are is escaping EXCEPT through the vent in the front of the mask. That means I am breathing in and out completely filtered air!

They come in awesome colors; image

The filters are great but are pricy, so I use my own charcoal masks with 2 non-woven paper filters.


Masks and How to Wear Them Correctly!

Wrong 4This person is not wearing a mask correctly.

WrongDo you see why?  She is breathing unfiltered air!

It was with much trepidation that I went to the eye doctor a few days ago. Knowing there was no way to socially distance while being examined was very stressful and my anxiety was awful.  Those fears were realized when I saw the doctor come out front with a mask that kept slipping off of her nose and had gaps on the side as the elastic was loose.

She attempted to approach me and I kept backing up across the room and finally I held my hand up, palm out, and aid I was deeply concerned about her mask and the fact that we were going to have to be close. She tightened it up and we went to the examining room. But when I asked her to stop letting her mask slip down…I dove in. I explained to her how I had gotten my mask to fit and why it was imperative for her to do so.  I explained to her the ways I assure that my masks fit correctly.

So let’s talk about that.  I am a very small person; I have to wear children’s glasses, I can still wear my baby jewelry…so you can imagine how frustrating finding a mask that fits well has been. When the pandemic hit I made my own, then a friend made some for me.  But they didn’t fit snuggly enough. I added straps instead of ear loops. That helped. I added a casing to put nose pieces through that I made out of spacers for window screens. Works perfectly. Then I added darts on each side.

But my masks started wearing out from being washed so much. So I use my really snug. great fitting masks for things like going to the grocery store or doctors visits and have made it through just fine. I know for a fact that I was exposed to the virus at least, up close to someone who did not have a mask on and tested positive within a few days.

We finally were able to get really well made masks on Etsy and I have tweaked each one to my specifications. But as this goes on longer my masks started to show wear. I had to find an answer to those quick trips like getting gas or a quick run to the health food store. I use my masks ONLY ONCE so I ordered a pack of triple layer white cotton ear-looped masks from Amazon. I got a pack of 50. I added a dart to each side to make them fit better and ordered these three products from Amazon;

Carbon Filters

Mask Extender

Nose Piece

I was all set. I also use two non-woven paper filters under each mask. (blue shop towels available form Amazon (pricy) or the Auto parts store).

Then I ordered a bed from a friend who has a mattress store at the beach. He explained to me that his delivery person was a non-masker. I told him it was a deal breaker, that I would get him a mask. When he showed up he put one one. But I was left with a pack of 50 surgical masks that were HUGE on me.

So, I got to work. I put a dart on the chin and refolded the bottom with another pleat. I stapled them in place being careful to only staple on the outer parts that already had holes.

 Mask dartSee the dart on the chin and how I folded the pleat while making sure to catch the strap?

When I wear it now I use the extender to make it fit snug (the silicone straps) and I use two paper filters and a carbon filter. These are trimly easy to breath in and talk in but my glasses do not fog and I can yell or blow real hard and no fog. SO I know I breathing ONLY filtered air!

DON”T wear a mask like this;

Wrong 2Wrong 3


12-Minute Exercise Bursts Offer Big Benefits

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hort bursts of physical exercise induce changes in the body’s levels of metabolites that correlate to an individual’s cardiometabolic, cardiovascular, and long-term health, a study by Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has found.

In a paper published in Circulation, the research team describes how about 12 minutes of acute cardiopulmonary exercise affected more than 80 percent of circulating metabolites, including pathways linked to a wide range of favorable health outcomes, thus identifying potential mechanisms that could contribute to a better understanding of cardiometabolic benefits of exercise.

“What was striking to us was the effects a brief bout of exercise can have on the circulating levels of metabolites that govern such key bodily functions as insulin resistance, oxidative stress, vascular reactivity, inflammation, and longevity,” said investigator Gregory Lewis, section head of Heart Failure at MGH and senior author of the study.

The MGH study drew on data from the Framingham Heart Study to measure the levels of 588 circulating metabolites before and immediately after 12 minutes of vigorous exercise in 411 middle-aged men and women.

The research team detected favorable shifts in a number of metabolites for which resting levels were previously shown to be associated with cardiometabolic disease. For example, glutamate, a key metabolite linked to heart disease, diabetes, and decreased longevity, fell by 29 percent. And DMGV, a metabolite associated with increased risk of diabetes and liver disease, dropped by 18 percent. The study further found that metabolic responses may be modulated by factors other than exercise, including a person’s sex and body mass index, with obesity possibly conferring partial resistance to the benefits of exercise.

Lower risk of depression with elevated exercise

35 minutes a day of physical activity may protect against new episodes, even in the genetically vulnerable

Exercise reduces chronic inflammation, protects heart, study says

After six weeks, mice had lower levels of inflammatory leukocytes

“Intriguingly, our study found that different metabolites tracked with different physiologic responses to exercise, and might therefore provide unique signatures in the bloodstream that reveal if a person is physically fit, much the way current blood tests determine how well the kidney and liver are functioning,” notes co-first author Matthew Nayor of the Heart Failure and Transplantation Section in the Division of Cardiology at MGH. “Lower levels of DMGV, for example, could signify higher levels of fitness.”

The Framingham Heart Study, which began in 1948 and now embraces three generations of participants, allowed MGH researchers to apply the same signatures used in the current study population to stored blood from earlier generations of participants. By studying the long-term effects of metabolic signatures of exercise responses, researchers were able to predict the future state of an individual’s health, and how long they are likely to live.

“We’re starting to better understand the molecular underpinnings of how exercise affects the body and use that knowledge to understand the metabolic architecture around exercise response patterns,” says co-first author Ravi Shah of the Heart Failure and Transplantation Section in the Division of Cardiology at MGH. “This approach has the potential to target people who have high blood pressure or many other metabolic risk factors in response to exercise, and set them on a healthier trajectory early in their lives.”

Lewis is associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing Laboratory at MGH. Nayor is a cardiologist at MGH and instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Shah is a cardiologist at MGH and assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Other co-authors include Ramachandran Vasan, professor of medicine at Boston University and principal investigator of the Framingham Heart Study, and Clary Clish, senior director of Metabolomics at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

The study was supported by the American Heart Association’s Grand Challenge Award and the National Institutes of Health.


How to Live Longer: The Health Drink Proven to Boost Heart Health and Life Longevity

HOW TO live longer: During these difficult times, less focus has been put on superficiality and more on one’s health and longevity. Consuming a certain drink daily could help boost your life expectancy. What is it?

Coconut water

 

Almost daily, new and innovative health products are thrusted in our faces claiming to be the holy grail of healthy living. It’s easy to understand how one can be confused by all the options. Often, it’s best to rely on the basics and when it comes to what to drink to help boost life longevity, there is one that could do just that.

Coconut water burst onto the scene and became a drink consumed not only while trekking through Asia.

Touted as an all-round miracle drink, leading health experts recommend getting in a daily dose of the water to help with a variety of health ailments and to boost life longevity.

Coconut water is the clear liquid, which is found inside green, immature coconuts and it’s these young coconuts which are flavored for their water.

Coconut water has less sugar and fewer calories compared to most juices and soft drinks and contains a type of ‘free’ sugar which means they’re not bound to fibre and are quickly absorbed into the bloodstream.

The drink also contains potassium, which is known for keeping the heart healthy and promoting muscular function.

The mineral has also been found to help regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals.

And it can reduce blood pressure and water retention and protect against stroke, osteoporosis and kidney stones.

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A Surprisingly Short Period of Inactivity Can Damage Your Health, Scientists Learn

By Tori Sprung   at  inverse.com

Sitting

Photo by Joanes Andueza on Unsplash

As a society, we aren’t getting as much exercise as we should. In fact, current activity guidelines state that adults should get at least 150 minutes of moderately intense activity — or 75 minutes of vigorous activity — every week. But research has found that one in four adults aren’t active enough.

It’s easy to see why. Many of us drive to work instead of walking — and for those of us who work desk jobs, many are often so focused on what we’re doing, we rarely get up from our desks except to visit the bathroom or get a drink. In short, though we might be busy, we aren’t moving very much. But after dealing with the stress of work week after week, it’s easy to daydream about unwinding on a warm beach, doing nothing but lounging around for a fortnight. But this might not be what our bodies need. In fact, it might actually be more harmful than we realize.

Our research looked at what effect even short periods of physical inactivity had on our bodies. We found that even just two weeks of low activity actually increased participants’ risk of later developing serious health conditions such as cardiovascular disease.

Keeping active

We know that physical activity is good for us. This is irrefutable, and we’ve known this for a long time. As far back as the 1950s, the link between day-to-day physical activity and health was first identified in the London transport workers study.

The study found that bus drivers were more likely to experience a heart attack compared to their bus conductor counterparts. The main difference between these two groups was that conductors spent their working day on their feet collecting fares from commuters, while bus drivers spent their days sitting down.

Since then, some have branded physical activity a “miracle cure” for cardiovascular risk. Yet, as a society, we are more sedentary than ever, and cardiovascular-related deaths remain the leading cause of death worldwide.

While we know that having a physically active lifestyle will improve our health, surely we aren’t doing any additional harm, even if we choose not to be physically active? We decided to examine exactly what the harmful effects of being physically inactive are.

For our study, we recruited young (aged 18-50 years), healthy weight (BMI less than 30), physically active individuals (meaning that they take more than 10,000 steps per day on average). After carrying out assessments to measure blood vessel health, body composition, and blood sugar control, we asked them to become inactive for two weeks.

Researchers assessed study participants’ health results after two weeks with a step counter.

To achieve this, participants were provided with a step counter and asked not to exceed 1,500 steps per day, which equates to approximately two laps of a full sized football pitch. After two weeks, we reassessed their blood vessel health, body composition, and blood sugar control to examine what effects two weeks of inactivity had on them. We then asked them to resume their usual routine and behaviors. Two weeks after resuming their normal daily lifestyles, we checked participants’ health markers to see if they’d returned to where they were when they’d started the trial.

Our group of participants successfully reduced their step count by an average of around 10,000 steps per day and, in doing so, increased their waking sedentary time by an average of 103 minutes per day. Artery function decreased following this two-week period of relative inactivity, but returned to their normal levels after two weeks following their usual lifestyles.

We were interested in seeing how activity levels influenced blood vessel health, since this is where most cardiovascular disease starts. Most of us don’t realize that our blood vessels are a complex system. They’re lined with muscle and constantly adapt to our needs by dilating (opening) and constricting (closing) to distribute blood where it’s most needed. For example, during exercise, vessels feeding organs such as the stomach will constrict, as it is inactive at this time, and so blood is redistributed to our working muscles to fuel movement. One of the earliest detectable signs of cardiovascular risk is a reduced function of this dilatory capacity.

To measure this, we used an imaging technique called flow-mediated dilation or FMD. FMD measures how well the arteries dilate and constrict, and it has been found to predict our future cardiovascular risk.

Heart health

We found that after as little as two weeks of inactivity there was a reduction in artery function. This indicates the start of cardiovascular disease development as a result of being inactive. We also observed an increase in traditional risk factors, such as body fat, waist circumference, fitness, and diabetes markers, including liver fat and insulin sensitivity.

Something we also observed — which we initially weren’t researching —was that resuming normal activity levels following two weeks of being physically inactive was below baseline. That is to say, our participants did not return back to normal within two weeks of completing the intervention.

This is interesting to consider, especially regarding the potential longer-term effects of acute physical inactivity. In real-world terms, acute physical inactivity could mean a bout of flu or a two-week beach holiday — anything that can have a potential longer-term effect on our usual habits and behavior.

These results show us that we need to make changes to public health messages and emphasize the harmful effect of even short-term physical inactivity. Small alterations to daily living can have a significant impact on health — positively or negatively. People should be encouraged to increase their physical activity levels, in any way possible. Simply increasing daily physical activity can have measurable benefits. This could include having a 10-minute walk during your lunch hour, standing from your desk on an hourly basis to break up sitting time, or parking your car at the back of the supermarket parking lot to get more steps in.

The impact of spending a large proportion of the day being inactive has received a lot of research in recent years. In fact, it has become a hot point of discussion among exercise scientists. As technology advances and our lives become increasingly geared towards convenience, it’s important this kind of research continues.

The health consequences of sedentary behavior are severe and numerous. Moving more in everyday life could be key in improving your overall health.

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Downsizing to an Early Death? Why Exercise is So Important as You Age

Exersize Photo by Justin Clark on Unsplash

well-documented that regular exercise is good for us. Being active can reduce your risk for a variety of diseases such as heart disease and cancer, as well as improving psychological well-being.

Current guidelines from the World Health Organization recommend getting 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity per week. This works out to about 20 to 30 minutes per day of activity like brisk walking, swimming or playing tennis.

It’s not much of a time commitment yet most people don’t achieve it. Barely 20 per cent of Canadians are considered physically active according to national guidelines. And if things in Canada are the same as in the United States, this number likely hasn’t changed in the past 15 years.

The good news is that the very best time to start exercising is now. Research from the United States and the United Kingdom reveals that middle-aged and older adults can reduce their risk of death by becoming more physically active, irrespective of past physical activity levels.

Why we exercise less as we age

Hidden among these statistics on physical activity is how much it decreases with age. As an adult, our activity usually peaks in our 20s. After that, there is a steady decline in vigorous activity (exercise that increases heart rate) throughout life, while light physical activity (such as easy walking) stays relatively constant until around 60 years of age and then declines. In addition, sedentary time increases.

Many will argue this is part of the ageing process: we get weaker as we age and therefore we can’t do as much vigorous activity.

However, the physiological changes in our body with age likely only account for a small portion in the decline in activity. People who remain active see only a fraction of the decrease in fitness compared to their inactive counterparts.

Much of this decrease in activity is due to conscious and unconscious changes in life circumstances. In our 20s, we’re more likely to have been engaged in competitive and recreational sports, rely more on transit and active transportation as we cannot afford our own car. Our entry-level jobs are more active, but as we progress up the career ladder, we’re likely to spend more time sitting at a desk.

Downsizing to an early death?

Retirement is also another significant stage at which time most people experience a further decrease in activity. Even if one’s job was sedentary, it usually provides a small amount of activity and unless a conscious effort is made to make that activity up in retirement, it will be lost.

Many people also downsize their home in retirement, perhaps moving to a one-story apartment and losing their yard. While there may be good reasons for downsizing, it also results in further decreases in activity as there are no stairs to take or yard to manage. Some people downsize purposely thinking they should be doing less activity.

As activity decreases, so does our fitness and strength levels. Because of those changes, we become even less capable of doing activities we did when we were younger, so we further decrease our activity, and the cycle continues.

As a result, risk factors such as high blood pressure, obesity and high blood sugar may appear — increasing our risk for disease and early death.

It’s how much you exercise now that matters

However, it’s not all bad. Our body can also adapt to increasing activity. And when it comes to exercise and health, what you have done lately is more important than what you did years or decades ago.

A study of more than 300,000 men and women aged 50 to 71 living in the U.S. divided participants into maintainers (high level of leisure activity throughout life), decreasers (high activity in teens and low in later life) and increasers (low activity in teens and high in later life).

Of the three groups, maintainers had the lowest risk for early death, but the increasers had a similar benefit. The decreasers didn’t fare much better than people who were inactive their entire life.

What matters is how much activity you do now.

When looking at total physical activity (leisure activity combined with occupational activity), similar results were reported among 15,000 people in the U.K.

Again, what mattered most was how much activity people were doing most recently, not 25 years earlier. Those who increased their activity had the lowest risk for early death, even if their previous activity levels were high to begin with. In addition, people with heart disease or cancer also benefited to the same extent as those without.

Walk for 20 minutes a day

Beginning, or even restarting, an exercise program in middle-age or later can be daunting. From time to time we’ll hear inspiring stories of people starting their first marathon in their 70s but these people are the exception and not everyone needs (or wants) to be exercising that much.

We demonstrated that as little as 20 minutes of brisk walking per day can result in a 20 per cent reduction in early death over seven years. If you increase to 90 minutes of walking or 25 minutes of running, you get a 35 per cent reduction.

However, the greatest gains come from doing nothing to doing something. And every little bit helps throughout the day, not just the time you go to the gym or do a run. Taking the stairs, going for a walk on your lunch or parking farther away all add up.

Scott Lear writes the weekly blog Feeling Healthy with Dr. Scott Lear.

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Some Vitamin Supplements Can Increase Risk of a Stroke, Study Finds

No one should EVER supplement with Calcium, it causes us to leach calcium from the bones as it is toxic to organs. But combining it with Vitamin D can cause problems.

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Vitamin supplements taken by millions of people can increase the risk of heart disease, a large study suggests .

New research has found links between certain types of daily pills combining calcium and vitamin D and an increased risk of stroke.

US scientists believe the combination may be responsible for atherosclerosis, a disease whereby plaque builds up in the arteries.

Such pills are commonly marketed as necessary to preserve bone strength and aimed at middle-aged and elderly people, whose risk of stroke is already higher.

Overall, it is estimated that around 45 per cent of UK adults take some form of vitamin supplements every day, supporting an industry worth roughly £430 million a year.

Published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, the new data forms part of a wider set of results suggesting that few nutritional supplements protect against cardiovascular disease or death .

Based on a review of 277 randomised controlled trials comprising nearly one million people, the study also questioned the effectiveness of a Mediterranean-style diet for improving resilience against heart disease.

Dr Safi Khan, who led the research at West Virginia University, said: “A combination of calcium and vitamin D was associated with a higher risk of stroke.”

He added: “Other supplements did not seem to have significant effect on mortality or cardiovascular outcomes.”

The research looked at the effect of 16 different nutritional supplements and eight dietary interventions on mortality and cardiovascular outcomes in the adult participants.

It concluded that cutting down on salt and eating omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in oily fish, offered some protection against heart disease, meanwhile folic acid offered some protection against stroke.

Supplements combining calcium and vitamin D appeared to increase the risk of having a stroke by 17 per cent.

However, scientists have urged caution in interpreting the results as establishing cause and effect is the field of nutrition is notoriously difficult.

“We found out only a few of the 16 nutritional supplements and one of the eight dietary interventions evaluated had some protective effect in cardiovascular risk reduction,” said Dr Khan.

Supplements that did not appear to have any significant effect on mortality or cardiovascular outcomes included selenium, vitamin A, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin D alone, calcium alone, folic acid, and iron.

NHS advice states that most people do not need to take vitamin supplements because they should receive all the vitamins and minerals they need by eating a balanced diet.


Garlic Powder vs. Whole Garlic

Garlic HeadPhoto by Mike Kenneally on Unsplash

Honestly, Just Use Garlic Powder    I came across this article that says we should give up the hassle of chopping garlic and just use garlic powder. White there are several dishes where garlic granules (I like the texture and flavor way better from granules) are better we difinetly need to use fresh garlic often for it’s health benefits.

  1. Garlic Contains Compounds With Potent Medicinal Properties–  Garlic is a plant in the Allium (onion) family.  Scientists now know that most of its health benefits are caused by sulfur compounds formed when a garlic clove is chopped, crushed or chewed. Perhaps the most famous of those is known as allicin. However, allicin is an unstable compound that is only briefly present in fresh garlic after it’s been cut or crushed.  Other compounds that may play a role in garlic’s health benefits include diallyl disulfide and s-allyl cysteine.  The sulfur compounds from garlic enter the body from the digestive tract and travel all over the body, where it exerts its potent biological effects.

Garlic is a plant in the onion family that’s grown for its distinctive taste and health benefits. It contains sulfur compounds, which are believed to bring some of the health benefits.

2. Garlic Is Highly Nutritious But Has Very Few Calories  Calorie for calorie, garlic is incredibly nutritious. A 1-ounce (28-gram) serving of garlic contains: Manganese: 23% of the RDA, Vitamin B6: 17% of the RDA,Vitamin C: 15% of the RDA, Selenium: 6% of the RDA, Fiber: 0.6 grams,  Decent amounts of calcium, copper, potassium, phosphorus, iron and vitamin B1. Garlic also contains trace amounts of various other nutrients. In fact, it contains a little bit of almost everything you need. This comes with 42 calories, 1.8 grams of protein and 9 grams of carbs.

3. Garlic Can Combat Sickness, Including the Common Cold–  Garlic supplements are known to boost the function of the immune system.One large, 12-week study found that a daily garlic supplement reduced the number of colds by 63% compared to a placebo. The average length of cold symptoms was also reduced by 70%, from 5 days in the placebo group to just 1.5 days in the garlic group. Another study found that a high dose of aged garlic extract (2.56 grams per day) reduced the number of days sick with cold or flu by 61%.

4. The Active Compounds in Garlic Can Reduce Blood Pressure–   Cardiovascular diseases like heart attacks and strokes are the world’s biggest killers.High blood pressure, or hypertension, is one of the most important drivers of these diseases. Human studies have found garlic supplements to have a significant impact on reducing blood pressure in people with high blood pressure.  In one study, 600–1,500 mg of aged garlic extract was just as effective as the drug Atenolol at reducing blood pressure over a 24-week period.  Supplement doses must be fairly high to have the desired effects. The amount needed is equivalent to about four cloves of garlic per day.

5. Garlic Improves Cholesterol Levels, Which May Lower the Risk of Heart Disease–    Garlic can lower total and LDL cholesterol. For those with high cholesterol, garlic supplements appear to reduce total and/or LDL cholesterol by about 10–15%.   Looking at LDL (the “bad”) and HDL (the “good”) cholesterol specifically, garlic appears to lower LDL but has no reliable effect on HDL .  High triglyceride levels are another known risk factor for heart disease, but garlic seems to have no significant effects on triglyceride levels . 

6. Garlic Contains Antioxidants That May Help Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia–  Oxidative damage from free radicals contributes to the aging process. Garlic contains antioxidants that support the body’s protective mechanisms against oxidative damage.  High doses of garlic supplements have been shown to increase antioxidant enzymes in humans, as well as significantly reduce oxidative stress in those with high blood pressure .  The combined effects on reducing cholesterol and blood pressure, as well as the antioxidant properties, may reduce the risk of common brain diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

7. Eating Garlic May Help Detoxify Heavy Metals in the Body–   At high doses, the sulfur compounds in garlic have been shown to protect against organ damage from heavy metal toxicity. A four-week study in employees of a car battery plant (excessive exposure to lead) found that garlic reduced lead levels in the blood by 19%. It also reduced many clinical signs of toxicity, including headaches and blood pressure.  Three doses of garlic each day even outperformed the drug D-penicillamine in reducing symptoms.

8. Garlic Is Easy to Include in Your Diet and Tastes Absolutely Delicious–  The last one is not a health benefit, but is still important. Garlic is very easy (and delicious) to include in your current diet. It complements most savory dishes, particularly soups and sauces. The strong taste of garlic can also add a punch to otherwise bland recipes. Garlic comes in several forms, from whole cloves and smooth pastes to powders and supplements like garlic extract and garlic oil.  However, keep in mind that there are some downsides to garlic, such as bad breath. There are also some people who are allergic to it. If you have a bleeding disorder or are taking blood-thinning medications, talk to your doctor before increasing your garlic intake. A common way to use garlic is to press a few cloves of fresh garlic with a garlic press, then mix it with extra virgin olive oil and a bit of salt.  This a healthy and super satisfying dressing.

The Bottom Line–  For thousands of years, garlic was believed to have medicinal properties. Science has now confirmed it. HEALTHLINE CHALLENGES


Want To Live Longer? Do These Four Things Daily

yoga on beach 2

By Jason Wachob

We all want to optimize our time on this planet and live the healthiest, longest lives possible. Joel Dudley, Ph.D., and Chris Mason, Ph.D., the founders of Onegevity, an AI-driven health care service, are committed to empowering people to better understand and take charge of their health through data-driven and customized solutions.

Dudley and Mason joined me on the mbg podcast to talk about what they believe doctors should be testing for, what we should be doing daily for our microbiome, and why prevention is critical for the future of health care.

A big topic here at mbg is longevity, and with advancements in genetic, microbiome, and blood testing, we know more than ever before. In this episode, we delve deeper into all that, but here, they offer four things we can all be doing right now, today:

1. Present your body with new challenges.

A simple, cost-effective way to try to reverse the effects of aging is to present your body with new challenges. “Maintaining your body’s ability to respond dynamically to the environment is important,” explained Dudley. This could be why things like HIIT and cold exposure are linked with greater longevity. It boils down to flexing your body’s ability to respond to challenges that will, in turn, build resilience.

2. Get quality sleep.

When asked about one of the key factors in living a long life, Mason responded that sleep is crucial. As for how much? He says somewhere from six to eight hours is optimal and reminds us that some essential processes occur only during sleep. We discussed the new research on the glymphatic system that connects the brain with our immune system, and he suggested that sleep may be the only time the body can drain unwanted things out of our brains.

3. Move, move, and move.

The scientists point out that while certain diseases such as Huntington’s disease and cystic fibrosis are genetic and may be difficult to prevent, through lifestyle changes such as exercise, a good diet, and a healthy microbiome, we may be able to move the needle on things like cardiovascular risk, longevity, and cognitive clarity. Dudley says while intense exercise such as HIIT may improve longevity, taking time each day to walk is a great option. It’s less about what exactly you’re doing and more about getting out and moving in some way.

4. Get baseline testing.

Mason and Dudley recommend getting testing (genetic, microbiome, blood work) done so you can have a baseline of what things look like now, so down the line you and your provider have something to compare to. Whether you have health issues or not, having more information pieced together can help create a picture of what’s going on inside you and may mean more effective care.

Whether it’s longevity or cardiovascular, gut, or immune health, it’s important to remember that every part of our health story is connected. Mason and Dudley explain that it takes the whole picture to understand what’s going on inside, and they have us excited about what the future of health looks like.


Nutrition Class with Millie Barnes in Riverside beginning January 16th!

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I am offering a 6 Weeks Nutrition Class beginning January 16th at Riverside Park United Methodist Church. We will study the basics of nutrition; how to meet your nutrient needs, how to lose weight, how to shop, eat out and many tips as to meal planning and cooking. Class is limited to 12 students, so sign up today!

I will review food diaries between classes to help you get on track.

Here is the link to register- (sign up before the 9th and get $5.00 off.   https://riversideparkumc.com/ministry/community-classes