Eating Organic Economically; How I Eat and Cook all Week.

GR_Welcome

Pic from Grassroots Market in Historic 5 Points.

1 whole organic chicken 9.00
1 pound grass-fed hamburger 7.99
18 eggs- Grassroots- 3.99
1 pound turkey bacon 5.79
½ pound salmon 4.99
1 pound raw butter 10.00
1 pound carrots 2.99
3 large onions 3.25
¾ pound coffee 7.99
3 beefsteak tomatoes 2.00
Garlic bulb .30
2 limes .99
2 lemons 1.10
3 green peppers bell peppers 2.99
1 bag celery 1.99
1 pint blueberries 3.99
1 bunch kale 3.99
3 large sweet potatoes 2.99
~ 74.34~ grocery cost

-24.50 minus the items I grow

49.84

The items in red are the things I grow in sub-irrigated containers; I used 5 gallon buckets, soil, perlite and made sub-irrigated containers. Growing from seed is cheap.

If you have a backyard, or a deck for container gardening, or grow lights indoors, you can save further in ways that processed food eaters can’t: Almost all year I grow salad greens, herbs, braising greens of some kind and cucumbers and tomatoes. (The salad herbs oregano, thyme, mint, basil, cilantro and parsley never quit here in any season!)

Items I make myself; almond butter made in the Champion juicer, coconut milk yogurt, mayonnaise, salad dressings. These things are very inexpensive to make, very easy to do…not much labor.

Starting on the day I shop, here’s how I eat and cook all week, very simply, but extremely healthy.

First Night; I roast a whole chicken by rubbing butter all over it, salt and peppering it, maybe some garlic or lemon juice and zest. Then roast it for 30 minutes on 450°. Then turn the oven down to 300° and bake for 30 minutes. Now turn the oven back up to 400° and roast that bird just 165°, checking for temp in the thickest part of the breast, not hitting the bone. Save the pan drippings for cooking, save the carcass for stock. Here’s a link to making stock- https://optimumnutrition.wordpress.com/2009/08/12/chicken-stock-101/

That is dinner the first night; a leg and thigh and some breast meat, pour pan drippings over it, using fat and gelatin in roasting pan. With some sautéed peppers and onions and a few slices of ripe tomato, here’s a great dinner.

Breakfast is usually 2 eggs, fried in butter or coconut oil, 3 slices of turkey bacon, some coconut milk yogurt and a handful of blueberries. And 6 ounces of Turkish coffee, ground and brewed each morning. Some mornings I have Ezekiel bread.

Lunch is usually whatever I’ve had for dinner the night before, or an Ezekiel bread sandwich, with meat, fresh olive oil mayonnaise, or almond butter. Maybe Ezekiel with almond butter and sauerkraut, toasted. Usually a cup of meat stock and/or coconut milk yogurt.

Second night; take the rest of the meat off of the chicken, make stock. Have a great chicken soup that night, add sautéed celery, carrots, bay leaf. Maybe some kale sautéed in chicken fat, some gelatin from chicken pan drippings, onions, mushrooms. Sliced tomatoes.

Third night; 1/3 pound hamburger patty, sautéed onions and peppers, 8 ounces chicken stock, sliced tomatoes, coconut milk yogurt.

Fourth night; fresh salmon with dill, Dijon and fresh lemon juice, sautéed peppers, mushrooms and onions, sliced tomatoes. A cup of chicken stock.

Fifth night; Chicken meat prepared however you want, sautéed kale, ½ sweet potato, sautéed mushrooms. Coconut milk Crème Brule and a few blueberries.

Sixth night; 1/3 pound hamburger patty, pan gravy, ½ sweet potato with butter, kale with onions.

Seventh Night; Rest of hamburger with peppers, onions, tomato, salsa, avocado and fresh corn tortilla.

Shop again, or have leftovers, or breakfast for dinner.

Extras I buy if I can afford them; cherries, plantains to fry, dark chocolate, steaks, roasts, Ezekiel bread, wine.

Things I always have in the kitchen; raw butter, Tropical Traditions Coconut Oil and their coconut cream (to use in recipes that call for heavy cream or for decadent desserts) Dijon mustard, olives, herbs and spices, an array of vinegars, olive oil, sesame oil, masa harina, coconut oil, lemons, limes, Kava tea, organic coffee, Yerba Mate Tea, quinoa, rice, teff, coconut and tapioca flours, coconut milk, curry sauces, olives.

Bear in mind that this is a very basic dinner menu, showing how to meet all of your calorie and nutrient needs affordably. These dinners reflect basic eating, by adding other ingredients I can get real fancy, and I do at times.


Never Buy Celery Again..

On Gizmodo

How to Grow Unlimited Celery Without Entering the Contra Code

How to Grow Unlimited Celery Without Entering the Contra Code

That little nubby celery stump that you normally throw away is valuable. It can live its own 99 lives. Here’s how to use it to punch your ticket to vegetative financial freedom.

You Should Do This If: You enjoy eating celery and don’t want to pay for it anymore.
Materials and Tools Required:
  • 1 bunch of celery
  • 1 knife
  • 1 shallow dish
  • 1 plant pot and general-use potting soil
  • 1 sunny windowsill

Cut the celery stump from the stalks about two inches from the bottom end (where they all connect—you know, the base). Fill the shallow dish with tepid water, set the stump in there too (cut side up), and put the dish in a sunny windowsill.

For Full Post…


Eating Organic Economically; How I Eat and Cook all Week.

paleo-pyramid

I hear all the time from friends and clients, “It’s too expensive to eat organic!”  If you eat packaged foods, buy gluten free or organic prepared foods, of course it is expensive.  You pay for convenience.  But change your perspective, make most foods from scratch and you will be able to lower your food bills, even eating organically.

1 whole organic chicken 10.00
1 pound grass-fed hamburger 6.00 a pound from JD Beef at RAM
18 eggs- Grassroots Market 5 Points– 3.99
1 pound Applegate Farms turkey bacon 3.79- Publix has it for 1.80 less than health foods stores!
½ pound salmon 4.99
1 pound  butter 5.89
1 pound carrots 2.99
3 large onions

¾ pound coffee 3.00 a week  (6.00 a pound, organic and free trade from Green Mountain Coffee- delivered to my door every 5 weeks).
3 green peppers bell peppers
1 bag celery 1.99
1 pint blueberries 3.99
1 bunch kale, Swiss chard, spinach, Malabar spinach or broccoli
3 large sweet potatoes 2.99
3 beefsteak tomatoes
 
2 Garlic bulb
2 limes .99 and 2 lemons 1.10

45.73- total grocery bill to meet all my nutrient and calorie needs

The items in red are the things I grow in sub-irrigated containers; I used 5 gallon buckets, soil, perlite and made sub-irrigated containers. Growing from seed is cheap.

If you have a backyard, or a deck for container gardening, or grow lights indoors, you can save further in ways that processed food eaters can’t: Almost all year I grow salad greens, herbs, braising greens of some kind and cucumbers and tomatoes. (The salad herbs oregano, thyme, mint, basil, cilantro and parsley never quit here in any season!)

Items I make myself; almond butter made in the Champion juicer, coconut milk yogurt, mayonnaise, salad dressings. These things are very inexpensive to make, very easy to do…not much labor.

Starting on the day I shop, here’s how I eat and cook all week, very simply, but extremely healthy.

First Night; I roast a whole chicken by rubbing butter all over it, salt and peppering it, maybe some garlic or lemon juice and zest. Then roast it for 30 minutes on 450°. Then turn the oven down to 300° and bake for 30 minutes. Now turn the oven back up to 400° and roast that bird just 165°, checking for temp in the thickest part of the breast, not hitting the bone. Save the pan drippings for cooking, save the carcass for stock. Here’s a link to making stock- https://optimumnutrition.wordpress.com/2009/08/12/chicken-stock-101/

That is dinner the first night; a leg and thigh and some breast meat, pour pan drippings over it, using fat and gelatin in roasting pan. With some sautéed peppers and onions and a few slices of ripe tomato, here’s a great dinner.

Breakfast is usually 2 eggs, fried in butter or coconut oil, 3 slices of turkey bacon, some coconut milk yogurt and a handful of blueberries. And 6 ounces of Turkish coffee, ground and brewed each morning. Some mornings I have Ezekiel bread.

Lunch is usually whatever I’ve had for dinner the night before, or an Ezekiel bread sandwich, with meat, fresh olive oil mayonnaise, or almond butter. Maybe Ezekiel with almond butter and sauerkraut, toasted. Usually a cup of meat stock and/or coconut milk yogurt.

Second night; take the rest of the meat off of the chicken, make stock. Have a great chicken soup that night, add sautéed celery, carrots, bay leaf. Maybe some kale sautéed in chicken fat, some gelatin from chicken pan drippings, onions, mushrooms. Sliced tomatoes.

Third night; 1/3 pound hamburger patty, sautéed onions and peppers, 8 ounces chicken stock, sliced tomatoes, coconut milk yogurt.

Fourth night; fresh salmon with dill, Dijon and fresh lemon juice, sautéed peppers, mushrooms and onions, sliced tomatoes. A cup of chicken stock.

Fifth night; Chicken meat prepared however you want, sautéed kale, ½ sweet potato, sautéed mushrooms. Coconut milk Crème Brule and a few blueberries.

Sixth night; 1/3 pound hamburger patty, pan gravy, ½ sweet potato with butter, kale with onions.

Seventh Night; Rest of hamburger with peppers, onions, tomato, salsa, avocado and fresh corn tortilla.

Shop again, or have leftovers, or breakfast for dinner.

Extras I buy if I can afford them; cherries, plantains to fry, dark chocolate, steaks, roasts, Ezekiel bread, wine.

Things I always have in the kitchen; raw butter, Tropical Traditions Coconut Oil and their coconut cream (to use in recipes that call for heavy cream or for decadent desserts) Dijon mustard, olives, herbs and spices, an array of vinegars, olive oil, sesame oil, masa harina, coconut oil, lemons, limes, Kava tea, organic coffee, Yerba Mate Tea, quinoa, rice, teff, coconut and tapioca flours, coconut milk, curry sauces, olives.

Bear in mind that this is a very basic dinner menu, showing how to meet all of your calorie and nutrient needs affordably. These dinners reflect basic eating, by adding other ingredients I can get real fancy, and I do at times.


How to Plant Garlic in a Container

From The Urban Gardener

by MIKE LIEBERMAN

Post image for How to Plant Garlic in a Container

The fall time is perfect to plant garlic to be ready during the spring. It’s also simple to do.

Each clove that you plant winds up turning into a clove of garlic. The larger the clove you plant, the larger the bulb it produces.

I saw a tip on soaking the cloves in Organic Gardening Magazine to help prevent rot from occurring.

Here is what you’ll need to soak the cloves:

  • Garlic cloves (amount depends on the size of your container)
  • Glass jar
  • Tablespoon of baking soda
  • Tablespoon of organic seaweed fertilizer

When removing the cloves from the bulb, you’ll want to leave the skin (or whatever it’s called) on each of the individual cloves. If the garlic is actually showing, it’s best not to use it. So be careful when removing the cloves.

Soak the cloves in the pre-soak solution for about 2 hours.

Since I’m planting in a 5-gallon container, I soaked about 8-10 cloves.

To plant the cloves:

  • Dig a hole about 2″ deep with your fingers.
  • Put the clove in pointy side-up and bury in the soil.
  • Space the cloves about 4-6″ apart.
  • Once they are all planted, water the container thoroughly.
  • Add mulch to the top or greenhouse it with a covering. I put a plastic bowl on top of it. This will keep the moisture locked in.

To Read the Full Post and see the Video- CLICK HERE


Garden and Back Porch Update

Spring 5.13.12

Back porch; pony tail palms, one old bonsai, cactus, in the very back are blue barrels with sweet potatoes, grow buckets with Swiss chard, beet greens, orange tree, Milkweed thistle. 

Air Chair 5.13.12

Billy’s willow work, my air chair, poppies and other flowers just sprouting, wind chimes I made from bamboo growing in yard. 

Bird Bath 5.13.12 Bird bath with the beginning of a container garden; cucumbers, Malabar spinach, broccoli, Milk thistle Weed, a few succulents. 

Better pictures later, when it’s not raining.  But it was a perfect day to plant things…something about planting, moving in and out of the rain today, bare feet in wet grass…really satisfying day. 


How To Grow Your Own Moss

From Apartment Therapy

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Water, buttermilk, moss and a blender is all you need to get started.

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I love outdoor spaces filled with overgrown blooms, piles of mismatched pots, bits and bobs of weathered sculpture and richly textured blankets of moss. Though moss could be associated with the words dilapidated or swampy it is actually a very healthy vegetation in that it has no known pests or diseases. It’s also extremely forgiving and requires little to no maintenance. It’s soft on your feet if used as a ground cover, stays green throughout colder months and is really easy to propagate. Learn how to grow your own moss after the jump.

What You Need

Ingredients
Existing sample moss from a yard or a garden store. It can be dead or alive.
Equal parts buttermilk and water

Tools
A blender
A paintbrush (optional)

Instructions

1. Measure two cups of water and two cups of buttermilk.

2. Pour both into the blender.

3. Top with moss to fill the blender.

4. Blend until you have a milkshake consistency. You want the existing moss to separate.

5. Paint or pour the mixture on rocks, fences, foundation, bricks, ceramic pots, trees or wherever you’d like to see moss grow. You can get creative and draw pictures if you’d like or write things if you’re feeling fancy.

Additional Notes:
Use a mister to keep moss moist for the first couple of weeks and if possible grow your moss in a shaded area. The moss should start to grow within 3 weeks


Ladybugs and Your Garden

From Apartment Therapy

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In many countries, it is considered good luck if a ladybug (or ladybird) lands on you and then flies away of its own will. In England and Germany, it’s thought that the number of spots has a bearing on the luck she will bring. But the best thing that can actually be proven about ladybugs is that they are a gardener’s best friend and an aphid’s worst enemy. MORE


Storing Your Harvest: Root Vegetable Bins

From Apartment Therapy

2011_06_27-RootStorageBin2.jpg

Even though my vegetable garden is just starting to sprout, I can’t help but think about storing this summer’s bounty in these simple wire and jute bins. MORE


Garden Inspiration: Espaliered Fruit Trees

From Apartment Therapy

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Espalier refers to the practice of tying the branches of trees to some sort of flat support (a wall or trellis, for example), creating formal, geometric patterns. The use of espaliered trees isn’t reserved for formal gardens, but are a great way to get a high fruit yield in a very limited space. And it’s a very graceful way to liven up a boring or unsightly wall or fence without fear of the tree getting out of control the way a vine would.

One huge advantage of espalier, is that it in cooler climates, it allows warmer weather species of trees to grow well because they absorb as much sunlight as untrained trees. This method can be very high maintenance, so you might want to limit how many you plant. But if you’re up for the challenge and work, it could make for a very striking and bountiful garden.

You can either completely DIY the training of the branches via tutorials from sites like Vintage Garden Gal or Gardening Know How, or you can purchase a tree from a local grower like Flowering Shrub Farm, where they’ve started the training for you.


Dandelions are No Lawn Menace

From Small Footprint Family

Post image for Dandelions are No Lawn Menace

Many wild plants and “weeds” are some of the most nutrient-dense greens you can eat. It is only in the past 100 or so years, as our food system became more and more industrialized, that wild superfoods dropped out of our diet. So I try to include them in mine when I can.

This spring I am enjoying Stinging Nettle Paté, made from the weeds in my garden, and wild arugula often graces my salad bowl—another delicious and nutritious garden weed. And if that weren’t delicious enough, this week, my CSA box had two bunches of dandelion greens, which are very easy to grow, medicinal, and very, very good for you.

For Full Article….