15+ Ways To Make A Trellis

From TipNut

Here’s a bunch of ways you can make trellises for both vegetable gardens and flower beds, many are simple in design (and to make) while others are more detailed and fancy (with a bit of woodworking skill required). Quite a selection of materials used such as bamboo, wooden poles and sticks, lumber, wire mesh, etc. A couple of the projects below have been featured previously on Tipnut and moved here for better organization. Enjoy!

digginfood.com

digginfood.com

With Wire Mesh: Shares a tip to install panels of welded wire mesh along fencing.

Wood A-Frame: With some plywood, hardware cloth, fasteners, basic tools, and a little time, you can fashion a hinged A-frame trellis to support peas, beans, tomatoes, or other vining plants.

vegetablegardener.com

vegetablegardener.com

marthastewart.com

marthastewart.com

Invisible Tip: Eyehooks screwed into siding or walls and networks of medium-gauge wire hold delicate vines. (Heavier climbers, such as roses, will need heavy-gauge wire.) Grid design examples included.

DIY Bamboo Project: Made with several canes of bamboo in different diameters and lashing cord.

finegardening.com

finegardening.com

urbanfarmonline.com

urbanfarmonline.com

Portable Design: Made with lumber and chicken wire. Free pdf tutorial download available.

Rustic Design: Simple project made from prunings or substitute 1-by-1 stakes from the nursery or lumberyard. The finished structure is 7 feet 4 1/2 inches tall and 3 feet wide.

sunset.com

sunset.com

gardengatemagazine.com

gardengatemagazine.com

Topper Plans: Three different designs to choose from to top a classic design trellis, free pdf downloads.

For Roses: The instructions are for an eight-by-four-foot trellis with a three-quarter-inch thickness, the strips of wood are spaced three inches apart.

marthastewart.com

marthastewart.com

myhomeideas.com

myhomeideas.com

Easy To Store: When the season ends, either untie and store the trellis or leave it in place year-round for visual interest.

Rustic Ti-pi Tutorial: Made with three to six poles, 1 1/2″ to 2 1/2″ in diameter and 4′ to 7′ long, copper or galvanized steel wire and grapevines or flexible willow branches.

sunset.com

sunset.com

thisoldhouse.com

thisoldhouse.com

With Lattice Fencing: Here’s how to turn lattice fencing and 2x4s into a three-panel focal point. Plan diagram included.

Bamboo & String Tee-Pee: Made to accommodate peas and cucumbers using scrap bamboo sticks tied together with cotton string.

deirdrepope.com

deirdrepope.com

 

For MORE Trellises…Read Complete Article


12 Lifesaving Canning Rules

If you can your garden bounty and especially if you are new to canning this could be handy.
Canning rules to keep your food safe from Modern survival blog will give you tips you need to can safely.
One thing I didn’t know was that you can’t do raw pack for stewed tomatoes. Good thing I haven’t done it yet but I probably would have if I was worried about losing a whole lot of ripe tomatoes. Good info.

photo credit modernsurvivalblog.com

photo credit modernsurvivalblog.com

http://modernsurvivalblog.com/survival-kitchen/12-lifesaving-canning-rules/


Eating Organic Economically; How I Eat and Cook all Week.

GR_Welcome

Pic from Grassroots Market in Historic 5 Points.

1 whole organic chicken 9.00
1 pound grass-fed hamburger 7.99
18 eggs- Grassroots- 3.99
1 pound turkey bacon 5.79
½ pound salmon 4.99
1 pound raw butter 10.00
1 pound carrots 2.99
3 large onions 3.25
¾ pound coffee 7.99
3 beefsteak tomatoes 2.00
Garlic bulb .30
2 limes .99
2 lemons 1.10
3 green peppers bell peppers 2.99
1 bag celery 1.99
1 pint blueberries 3.99
1 bunch kale 3.99
3 large sweet potatoes 2.99
~ 74.34~ grocery cost

-24.50 minus the items I grow

49.84

The items in red are the things I grow in sub-irrigated containers; I used 5 gallon buckets, soil, perlite and made sub-irrigated containers. Growing from seed is cheap.

If you have a backyard, or a deck for container gardening, or grow lights indoors, you can save further in ways that processed food eaters can’t: Almost all year I grow salad greens, herbs, braising greens of some kind and cucumbers and tomatoes. (The salad herbs oregano, thyme, mint, basil, cilantro and parsley never quit here in any season!)

Items I make myself; almond butter made in the Champion juicer, coconut milk yogurt, mayonnaise, salad dressings. These things are very inexpensive to make, very easy to do…not much labor.

Starting on the day I shop, here’s how I eat and cook all week, very simply, but extremely healthy.

First Night; I roast a whole chicken by rubbing butter all over it, salt and peppering it, maybe some garlic or lemon juice and zest. Then roast it for 30 minutes on 450°. Then turn the oven down to 300° and bake for 30 minutes. Now turn the oven back up to 400° and roast that bird just 165°, checking for temp in the thickest part of the breast, not hitting the bone. Save the pan drippings for cooking, save the carcass for stock. Here’s a link to making stock- https://optimumnutrition.wordpress.com/2009/08/12/chicken-stock-101/

That is dinner the first night; a leg and thigh and some breast meat, pour pan drippings over it, using fat and gelatin in roasting pan. With some sautéed peppers and onions and a few slices of ripe tomato, here’s a great dinner.

Breakfast is usually 2 eggs, fried in butter or coconut oil, 3 slices of turkey bacon, some coconut milk yogurt and a handful of blueberries. And 6 ounces of Turkish coffee, ground and brewed each morning. Some mornings I have Ezekiel bread.

Lunch is usually whatever I’ve had for dinner the night before, or an Ezekiel bread sandwich, with meat, fresh olive oil mayonnaise, or almond butter. Maybe Ezekiel with almond butter and sauerkraut, toasted. Usually a cup of meat stock and/or coconut milk yogurt.

Second night; take the rest of the meat off of the chicken, make stock. Have a great chicken soup that night, add sautéed celery, carrots, bay leaf. Maybe some kale sautéed in chicken fat, some gelatin from chicken pan drippings, onions, mushrooms. Sliced tomatoes.

Third night; 1/3 pound hamburger patty, sautéed onions and peppers, 8 ounces chicken stock, sliced tomatoes, coconut milk yogurt.

Fourth night; fresh salmon with dill, Dijon and fresh lemon juice, sautéed peppers, mushrooms and onions, sliced tomatoes. A cup of chicken stock.

Fifth night; Chicken meat prepared however you want, sautéed kale, ½ sweet potato, sautéed mushrooms. Coconut milk Crème Brule and a few blueberries.

Sixth night; 1/3 pound hamburger patty, pan gravy, ½ sweet potato with butter, kale with onions.

Seventh Night; Rest of hamburger with peppers, onions, tomato, salsa, avocado and fresh corn tortilla.

Shop again, or have leftovers, or breakfast for dinner.

Extras I buy if I can afford them; cherries, plantains to fry, dark chocolate, steaks, roasts, Ezekiel bread, wine.

Things I always have in the kitchen; raw butter, Tropical Traditions Coconut Oil and their coconut cream (to use in recipes that call for heavy cream or for decadent desserts) Dijon mustard, olives, herbs and spices, an array of vinegars, olive oil, sesame oil, masa harina, coconut oil, lemons, limes, Kava tea, organic coffee, Yerba Mate Tea, quinoa, rice, teff, coconut and tapioca flours, coconut milk, curry sauces, olives.

Bear in mind that this is a very basic dinner menu, showing how to meet all of your calorie and nutrient needs affordably. These dinners reflect basic eating, by adding other ingredients I can get real fancy, and I do at times.


Never Buy Celery Again..

On Gizmodo

How to Grow Unlimited Celery Without Entering the Contra Code

How to Grow Unlimited Celery Without Entering the Contra Code

That little nubby celery stump that you normally throw away is valuable. It can live its own 99 lives. Here’s how to use it to punch your ticket to vegetative financial freedom.

You Should Do This If: You enjoy eating celery and don’t want to pay for it anymore.
Materials and Tools Required:
  • 1 bunch of celery
  • 1 knife
  • 1 shallow dish
  • 1 plant pot and general-use potting soil
  • 1 sunny windowsill

Cut the celery stump from the stalks about two inches from the bottom end (where they all connect—you know, the base). Fill the shallow dish with tepid water, set the stump in there too (cut side up), and put the dish in a sunny windowsill.

For Full Post…


Eating Organic Economically; How I Eat and Cook all Week.

paleo-pyramid

I hear all the time from friends and clients, “It’s too expensive to eat organic!”  If you eat packaged foods, buy gluten free or organic prepared foods, of course it is expensive.  You pay for convenience.  But change your perspective, make most foods from scratch and you will be able to lower your food bills, even eating organically.

1 whole organic chicken 10.00
1 pound grass-fed hamburger 6.00 a pound from JD Beef at RAM
18 eggs- Grassroots Market 5 Points– 3.99
1 pound Applegate Farms turkey bacon 3.79- Publix has it for 1.80 less than health foods stores!
½ pound salmon 4.99
1 pound  butter 5.89
1 pound carrots 2.99
3 large onions

¾ pound coffee 3.00 a week  (6.00 a pound, organic and free trade from Green Mountain Coffee- delivered to my door every 5 weeks).
3 green peppers bell peppers
1 bag celery 1.99
1 pint blueberries 3.99
1 bunch kale, Swiss chard, spinach, Malabar spinach or broccoli
3 large sweet potatoes 2.99
3 beefsteak tomatoes
 
2 Garlic bulb
2 limes .99 and 2 lemons 1.10

45.73- total grocery bill to meet all my nutrient and calorie needs

The items in red are the things I grow in sub-irrigated containers; I used 5 gallon buckets, soil, perlite and made sub-irrigated containers. Growing from seed is cheap.

If you have a backyard, or a deck for container gardening, or grow lights indoors, you can save further in ways that processed food eaters can’t: Almost all year I grow salad greens, herbs, braising greens of some kind and cucumbers and tomatoes. (The salad herbs oregano, thyme, mint, basil, cilantro and parsley never quit here in any season!)

Items I make myself; almond butter made in the Champion juicer, coconut milk yogurt, mayonnaise, salad dressings. These things are very inexpensive to make, very easy to do…not much labor.

Starting on the day I shop, here’s how I eat and cook all week, very simply, but extremely healthy.

First Night; I roast a whole chicken by rubbing butter all over it, salt and peppering it, maybe some garlic or lemon juice and zest. Then roast it for 30 minutes on 450°. Then turn the oven down to 300° and bake for 30 minutes. Now turn the oven back up to 400° and roast that bird just 165°, checking for temp in the thickest part of the breast, not hitting the bone. Save the pan drippings for cooking, save the carcass for stock. Here’s a link to making stock- https://optimumnutrition.wordpress.com/2009/08/12/chicken-stock-101/

That is dinner the first night; a leg and thigh and some breast meat, pour pan drippings over it, using fat and gelatin in roasting pan. With some sautéed peppers and onions and a few slices of ripe tomato, here’s a great dinner.

Breakfast is usually 2 eggs, fried in butter or coconut oil, 3 slices of turkey bacon, some coconut milk yogurt and a handful of blueberries. And 6 ounces of Turkish coffee, ground and brewed each morning. Some mornings I have Ezekiel bread.

Lunch is usually whatever I’ve had for dinner the night before, or an Ezekiel bread sandwich, with meat, fresh olive oil mayonnaise, or almond butter. Maybe Ezekiel with almond butter and sauerkraut, toasted. Usually a cup of meat stock and/or coconut milk yogurt.

Second night; take the rest of the meat off of the chicken, make stock. Have a great chicken soup that night, add sautéed celery, carrots, bay leaf. Maybe some kale sautéed in chicken fat, some gelatin from chicken pan drippings, onions, mushrooms. Sliced tomatoes.

Third night; 1/3 pound hamburger patty, sautéed onions and peppers, 8 ounces chicken stock, sliced tomatoes, coconut milk yogurt.

Fourth night; fresh salmon with dill, Dijon and fresh lemon juice, sautéed peppers, mushrooms and onions, sliced tomatoes. A cup of chicken stock.

Fifth night; Chicken meat prepared however you want, sautéed kale, ½ sweet potato, sautéed mushrooms. Coconut milk Crème Brule and a few blueberries.

Sixth night; 1/3 pound hamburger patty, pan gravy, ½ sweet potato with butter, kale with onions.

Seventh Night; Rest of hamburger with peppers, onions, tomato, salsa, avocado and fresh corn tortilla.

Shop again, or have leftovers, or breakfast for dinner.

Extras I buy if I can afford them; cherries, plantains to fry, dark chocolate, steaks, roasts, Ezekiel bread, wine.

Things I always have in the kitchen; raw butter, Tropical Traditions Coconut Oil and their coconut cream (to use in recipes that call for heavy cream or for decadent desserts) Dijon mustard, olives, herbs and spices, an array of vinegars, olive oil, sesame oil, masa harina, coconut oil, lemons, limes, Kava tea, organic coffee, Yerba Mate Tea, quinoa, rice, teff, coconut and tapioca flours, coconut milk, curry sauces, olives.

Bear in mind that this is a very basic dinner menu, showing how to meet all of your calorie and nutrient needs affordably. These dinners reflect basic eating, by adding other ingredients I can get real fancy, and I do at times.


How to Plant Garlic in a Container

From The Urban Gardener

by MIKE LIEBERMAN

Post image for How to Plant Garlic in a Container

The fall time is perfect to plant garlic to be ready during the spring. It’s also simple to do.

Each clove that you plant winds up turning into a clove of garlic. The larger the clove you plant, the larger the bulb it produces.

I saw a tip on soaking the cloves in Organic Gardening Magazine to help prevent rot from occurring.

Here is what you’ll need to soak the cloves:

  • Garlic cloves (amount depends on the size of your container)
  • Glass jar
  • Tablespoon of baking soda
  • Tablespoon of organic seaweed fertilizer

When removing the cloves from the bulb, you’ll want to leave the skin (or whatever it’s called) on each of the individual cloves. If the garlic is actually showing, it’s best not to use it. So be careful when removing the cloves.

Soak the cloves in the pre-soak solution for about 2 hours.

Since I’m planting in a 5-gallon container, I soaked about 8-10 cloves.

To plant the cloves:

  • Dig a hole about 2″ deep with your fingers.
  • Put the clove in pointy side-up and bury in the soil.
  • Space the cloves about 4-6″ apart.
  • Once they are all planted, water the container thoroughly.
  • Add mulch to the top or greenhouse it with a covering. I put a plastic bowl on top of it. This will keep the moisture locked in.

To Read the Full Post and see the Video- CLICK HERE


Garden and Back Porch Update

Spring 5.13.12

Back porch; pony tail palms, one old bonsai, cactus, in the very back are blue barrels with sweet potatoes, grow buckets with Swiss chard, beet greens, orange tree, Milkweed thistle. 

Air Chair 5.13.12

Billy’s willow work, my air chair, poppies and other flowers just sprouting, wind chimes I made from bamboo growing in yard. 

Bird Bath 5.13.12 Bird bath with the beginning of a container garden; cucumbers, Malabar spinach, broccoli, Milk thistle Weed, a few succulents. 

Better pictures later, when it’s not raining.  But it was a perfect day to plant things…something about planting, moving in and out of the rain today, bare feet in wet grass…really satisfying day.