Low-Dose THC Has Positive Effect on Morbidity, Quality of Life and Mortality in Geriatric and Palliative Patients

Cannabis Herb And Leaves For Treatment Broth, Tincture, Extract, Oil. Selective Focus.

The study was published by the peer-reviewed journal peer-reviewed journal MMW – Fortschritte der Medizin, as well as on the website for the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

“Cannabis-containing medicines have been successfully used in our practice for more than 20 years in pain and especially in geriatric and palliative patients”, notes the abstract of the study. “While it was initially a very indication-specific use (pain, loss of appetite, etc.) and also with higher THC doses, this changed over time to low THC doses and a therapy focus on suffering-perpetuating symptoms and especially on stress (Matrix of Symptoms).”
As part of the legally prescribed companion survey, researchers “evaluated our data in parallel and discussed it publicly in a series of publications. Based on these published results, the article is intended to show an overview of our experiences.”

Researchers found that “Low-dose THC has a positive effect on morbidity, side effects, quality of life and mortality in geriatric and palliative patients.”

They conclude by stating that “Early therapy is particularly appropriate in geriatric and palliative patients due to the clear benefit-risk ratio of low-dose THC.”

Below is the study’s full abstract.

Abstract

Background: Cannabis-containing medicines have been successfully used in our practice for more than 20 years in pain and especially in geriatric and palliative patients. While it was initially a very indication-specific use (pain, loss of appetite, etc.) and also with higher THC doses, this changed over time to low THC doses and a therapy focus on suffering-perpetuating symptoms and especially on stress (Matrix of Symptoms).

Method: As part of the legally prescribed companion survey, we evaluated our data in parallel and discussed it publicly in a series of publications. Based on these published results, the article is intended to show an overview of our experiences.

Results: Low-dose THC has a positive effect on morbidity, side effects, quality of life and mortality in geriatric and palliative patients.

Conclusion: Early therapy is particularly appropriate in geriatric and palliative patients due to the clear benefit-risk ratio of low-dose THC.


Hearts of Palm and Avocado Salad

Hearts of Palm and Avocado Salad

I grew up eating Swamp Cabbage, also known as Cabbage Palm. The first time I ate it my dad dug one up while we were camping on the banks of the Okeechobee. He said we would use part of it for lunch, then we took a hike. My dad saw a small brook with water running and took out his pocket knife and built a little water-wheel with the stack and fronds from the cabbage palm.  Later we make some swamp cabbage for lunch.

This recipe is one of my favorite salads.

Hearts of Palm and Avocado Salad with Lime

Serving Size : 4

1/2 cup lime juice
1 tomato
1/4 cup white wine vinegar
1/2 clove garlic — crushed
1 pinch salt
1 tiny pinch red pepper flakes
2 cans hearts of palm — julienned
2 ripe California avocados
1 head leaf lettuce
1 head butter lettuce
1 medium red onion — thin rings

1) Combine first 5 ingredients together in blender for dressing. let sit for about 20 min.

2) Tear lettuces in bite size pieces. Combine with the rest of the ingredients. toss with salad dressing. Serve immediately


My Level of Living Green

  I started my Blog in 2008, I woke up one morning and had gotten 5000 visits from all over the world!  No Impact M<an had seen my site and published the article that put my Blog on the map!!

Tree of Life - Copy

Here is that article…

I am soooo excited!  One of my all time favorite bloggers, Colin Beavan, published an article from my blog!   His blog, NoImpactMan.com, is a blog that I follow religiously.  I have always been a a serious environmentalist, way before it was cool the first time around..and I am talking back in 1972 when I decided to use cloth diapers instead of that new product (Pampers) everyone else was sooo excited about.  I still chose to use a clothesline with the first 4 kids diapers (until I moved to a neighborhood (yuck!) that forbid clotheslines.

Colin’s’ blog made me realize there was a LOT more I could be doing.  Hence, the list he published….

April 14, 2009
Thirty-one tips for reducing your impact while saving money

I was reading through comments here on the blog last night and I found this great list of tips by reader Millie Barnes, who writes a blog about health and gardening called Optimum Nutrition. Her tips were just too comprehensive to let them languish in the comments. So here they are (I don’t even mind including the plug for her products). Thanks Millie!


My Level of Living Green
by Millie Barnes

1) Air dry all laundry–had to put a lock on the dryer cord to convince my daughters I was serious–they have learned to plan ahead! I wash all laundry in cold water, always wash full loads, and use a drying rack inside if it is raining. It’s good for the earth and great for your skin, a free humidifier in the house. Which also makes it feel a few degrees warmer in winter, and cooler in summer. I use soapnuts for laundry. http://www.zamuta.com/

2) Buy all organic.

3) Buy all organic non-toxic beauty care products and make-up. I make my own skin care cleanser and moisturizers. I make my own soap.

4) Use baking soda and vinegar for cleaning the bathroom. I use Ms. Meyer Clean Day for dishes, Citri-Clean for counters and general purpose cleaning. I use a loofah for scrubbing dishes (I am growing my own right now so I won’t have to buy them anymore!) My sister is making scrubbies by crocheting them, we will offer these for sale soon!

5) Take cloth bags to store for groceries and all other purchases. Take muslin bags I made to grocery store for produce.

6) Recycle, re-use, make my own and have stopped buying anything I don’t really need.

7) Don’t use paper towels, never have. Used cloth diapers for all 5 kids.

8) Don’t buy stuff in plastic, I try to buy all glass. Store all food in glass. Re-use glass jars. I mostly buy real food (meat, produce) try to not buy anything that needs a label, so no packaging.

9) I use a bidet and cloth wipes. (don’t freak, we all used that same choice when we used cloth diapers and wash clothes on our baby’s tushes!)

10) Make my own gluten free granola, make my own mayonnaise, salad dressings, spice blends.

11) I use a compost toilet, no toilet paper (think cloth baby wash clothes).

13) Bokashi (a way to deal with indoor kitchen scraps with NO odor and yields compost WAY faster). I have been using the Bokashi method of dealing with kitchen waste for about 3 weeks now…I love it!

14) Use very low flow shower heads. Ace Hardware has a 1.5 GPM with a shut-off valve.

15) Use all CF light bulbs…and use them as little as possible. I have one evening a week that I use no lights..on Shabbat! Dinner by candlelight!

16) Use grey water from shower (I keep a 3 gallon bucket in shower and use it throughout the day to flush the toilet, take what’s left to the flower beds.

17) Use water from rinsing dishes to water flower beds.

18) Run as few errands as possible, car pool and combine trips.

19) Use micro-cloths to clean with, even on glass you do not need cleaning products!

20) NEVER buy bottled water. I bought a Kleen Kanteen for each person in the family, we refill and take with us. I’ve had mine over a year.

21) Go paperless or CD-less as much as possible. I provide my clients with emails of my book, but still put cookbook software on CD.

22) Use only a hurricane lamp when we sit outside at night. It gives enough light to read by…but is perfect turned low …for just hanging out. Very romantic, too!

23) Use candlelight at dinner, not just on Shabbat!

26) I put in a raised bed garden, square foot garden I have green leaf lettuce in a grow box, cherry and big sweet tomatoes, basil, thyme. I have sweet potatoes growing, beets (mmmm, beet greens), onions, Swiss chard, purple flowering kale, nasturtiums, broccoli, cucumbers, peppers, red potatoes, a banana tree. Inside I am growing cucumbers and strawberries hydroponically.

27) I use a non-disposable razor, an old-fashioned stainless steel, very high quality razor that uses double edged blades. It was 24.00 from ClassicShaving.com. The blades are 10 for 5.99, and they are double edged! They give the closest, smoothest shave you can imagine! No disposable blade can compare.

28) Wash dishes with 2 dish pans in the sink, one for hot soapy water, one with warm rinse water. Do glasses first, pause a moment to let the soapy water drip off, then move to rinse water. Stop when rinse water is almost full and rinse quickly. Repeat with silver, plates, then pots and utensils. All with 2 dishpans full of water. Then I pour the soapy water, with all that organic matter, onto my plants in the garden. It helps repel pests and loosens the soil. And good for the biceps when you carry it outdoors.

29) I water my garden with buckets from the rain barrels that are under the eaves of my garage. 10 feet from my garden. The front flower garden gets watered entirely from the dish water.

30) I work out at home, no expensive gym memberships that I never used anyway. I save all the expense of membership, and gas and time driving. I have a set of weights, two exercise balls, a yoga mat and a chin-up bar.


The PERFECT Baked Potato

Baked potato

Perfect baked Potato

Salt and pepper

4 (7- to 9-ounce) russet potatoes, unpeeled, each lightly pricked with fork in 6 places

1 tablespoon ghee or Olive oil

1. Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 450 degrees. Dissolve 2 tablespoons salt in 1/2 cup water in large bowl. Place potatoes in bowl and toss so exteriors of potatoes are evenly moistened. Transfer potatoes to wire rack set in rimmed baking sheet and bake until center of largest potato registers 205 degrees, 45 minutes to 1 hour.

2. Remove potatoes from oven and brush tops and sides with oil. Return potatoes to oven and continue to bake for 10 minutes.

3. Remove potatoes from oven and, using paring knife, make 2 slits, forming X, in each potato. Using clean dish towel, hold ends and squeeze slightly to push flesh up and out. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve immediately.

Why You Shouldn’t Microwave

A microwave might seem like a fast way to “bake” a potato, but we found two reasons why it’s actually the worst approach. First, microwaves heat foods very unevenly, so some parts of the potato might rapidly reach 205 degrees while others get to only 180 degrees. Second, rapidly heating a potato causes pressure to build and cell walls to burst, releasing starch molecules that glue together the broken cell walls.


Ultra-processed foods are harmful for our health — here’s why

Junk Food

In countries such as the UK, US, and Canada, ultra-processed foods now account for 50 percent or more of calories consumed. This is concerning, given that these foods have been linked to a number of different health conditions, including a greater risk of obesity and various chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and dementia.

Ultra-processed foods are concoctions of various industrial ingredients (such as emulsifiers, thickeners, and artificial flavors) amalgamated into food products by a series of manufacturing processes.

The intense industrial processes used to produce ultra-processed foods destroy the natural structure of the food ingredients and strip away many beneficial nutrients such as fiber, vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals.

Many of us are well aware that ultra-processed foods are harmful to our health. But it’s been unclear if this is simply because these foods are of poor nutritional value. Now, two new studies have shown that poor nutrition may not be enough to explain their health risks. This suggests that other factors may be needed to fully explain their health risks.

The role of inflammation

The first study, which looked at over 20,000 healthy Italian adults, found that participants who consumed the highest number of ultra-processed foods had an increased risk of dying prematurely from any cause. The second study, which looked at over 50,000 US male health professionals, found high consumption of ultra-processed foods was associated with a greater risk of colon cancer.

What’s most interesting about these studies is that the health risks from eating a diet high in ultra-processed foods remained even after they had accounted for the poor nutritional quality of their diets. This suggests that other factors contribute to the harm caused by ultra-processed foods.

It also implies that getting the right nutrients elsewhere in the diet may not be enough to cancel out the risk of disease from consuming ultra-processed foods. Similarly, attempts by the food industry to improve the nutritional value of ultra-processed foods by adding a few more vitamins may be side-stepping a more fundamental problem with these foods.


What You Should Do To Vegetables Before Roasting Them Read More:

Roasted Veggies

Pre-cooking your vegetables before roasting them is the best way to make them caramelized, yet tender. You can either parboil your produce in water or stick to the single sheet pan prep and steam roast your veggies first, as recommended by Spoon University. By steaming the veggies before roasting them, your produce will retain its moisture instead of drying out.

In order to do this, preheat your oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Then, chop your veggies into uniform-sized pieces and line a sheet pan with foil. Spread your veggies in a single layer on the pan and season with salt, pepper, and olive oil, and consider adding a few splashes of vinegar to give your roasted vegetables an extra kick. Cover the vegetables with a layer of foil and steam for half of the cooking time with the foil on. Remove the foil and uncover for the second half of the cooking time to allow the vegetables to roast and caramelize.

While this method will work for roasting nearly any vegetable, keep in mind, that cook time will vary depending on the type of produce you’re roasting. Root vegetables like beets, potatoes, and carrots may take up to 45 minutes, while thin veggies like asparagus and green beans only take 10 to 20 minutes, per The Kitchn.


Best (and Crispy!) Eggplant Parmesan!

Crispy Eggplant Parmesan

I first had Eggplant Parmesan when I was 24 years old, I absolutely loved the flavor but felt like I could really improve on the texture. It seemed like it was just a gloopy mess, like a casserole. So I started playing with the recipe. It took a while to figure it out and here is the results!

I make my own Marinara Sauce as well as making the Vegan Parmesan Cheese. I use Violife Mozzerella Cheese.  Although Follow Your Heart Brand makes Vegan Parmesan, it has almost no flavor. And Go Veggie Makes on that tastes good, it is a soy based product. I use very few soy products as they are not healthy. I will use Tempeh and Edamame occasionally as they are fermented and way easier to digest. I have a severe reaction to tofu and other processed soy products but do not react to edamame and tempeh.

Crispy Eggplant Parmesan Stacks

serves 4

2 small eggplants (about 12 ounces each)
1 cup rice flour
3 large eggs , beaten
½ cup fine gluten-free breadcrumbs
1 teaspoon dried oregano
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
½ cup vegan Parmesan cheese
½ pound vegan mozzarella , packaged or fresh, shredded
3 cups marinara, slightly thickened with tomato paste
Chopped fresh parsley to serve or pesto

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly oil a rimmed baking sheet.

Leaving the peel on the eggplant, slice them into one-inch slices. Place the flour on a plate, and place the eggs in a shallow bowl. Mix the breadcrumbs with the oregano, 1 teaspoon kosher salt, and the pepper on a separate plate.

Coat both sides of each slice of eggplant in the plate with the flour. Dip each slice into the beaten eggs, then allow any excess egg to drip back into the bowl. Place the eggplant slices on the plate with the breadcrumbs, turn it to coat both sides. Place the coated eggplant on a sheet pan.

Bake eggplant in oven for about 12-15 minutes each side, just until golden brown, flipping half way through.

Place each browned slice of eggplant on the sheet pan, top with marinara, then mozzarella and parmesan. Place other slice on top of that, choosing one that is close in size or slightly smaller. Then put marinara on top, then mozzarella on top. Do not cover the entire top as you want some of the crispiness to stay crispy! Top with parmesan about 7 minutes before removing from oven. Remove from the oven


The #1 Best Eating Habit for Heart Health, New Study Suggests

heart to heart - Copy

Remember that fruits and vegetables are potassium-rich, but so are seafood, and legumes. Include bananas, oranges, antelope, apricots, grapefruit, prunes, dates and raisins. .

While there are plenty of vitamins and nutrients you’ll want to ensure are found in your regular diet—we’re looking at you, vitamin B, vitamin C, and vitamin D—potassium should definitely be one of them. A new study has shown that there happens to be a certain eating habit that can seriously benefit the health of your heart, and that’s consuming potassium-rich foods. Apparently, having a decent amount of potassium in your system can reduce the harmful effects of excess sodium in your diet and lower blood pressure.

In the study published in the European Heart Journal, 24,963 participants were brought on between 1993 and 1997. At the time, they ranged from 40 to 79 years old with the average being 58 years old for women and 59 for men. The study initially involved the participants providing information regarding certain lifestyle choices and also having their blood pressure noted and urine samples analyzed for both sodium and potassium levels.

When those behind the study again took a look at the participants around 19 and a half years later, they found that 55% had dealt with serious and even potentially fatal issues with cardiovascular disease. It was found that those who had the highest amounts of potassium in the diet were 13% less likely to face cardiovascular problems compared to those who had the least amount of potassium in the systems.

“Our findings indicate that a heart-healthy diet goes beyond limiting salt to boosting potassium content,” said study author Professor Liffert Vogt of Amsterdam University Medical Centers, the Netherlands, via EurekAlert! 

“This study adds to the body of evidence that suggests a higher potassium intake and lower sodium consumption benefits blood pressure,” Elizabeth Ward, MS, RDN, and co-author of The Menopause Diet Plan, A Natural Guide to Hormones, Health and Happiness, tells Eat This, Not That!

When it comes to why a potassium-rich diet helps to reduce the effects of salt and lowers blood pressure, Ward explains that “potassium and sodium have opposite effects on blood pressure—potassium helps lower it and sodium tends to increase it.” Ward also notes that “the more potassium you consume, the more sodium is lost in your urine.” Beyond that, “potassium also helps to ease tension in blood vessel walls, which also helps better regulate blood pressure.”

At the same time, Ward says, “While potassium is important for blood pressure control and for other reasons, some people need to be careful. Excess potassium can be harmful in patients with kidney disease, for example.”

Ward says you shouldn’t “look to potassium supplements to take the place of food,” explaining that “it’s likely that the fluid and phytonutrients in potassium-rich foods help to contribute to better blood pressure.”

To get what you’re looking for from your diet, Ward points out that “potassium is prone to destruction with processing, so raw and lightly processed foods have the highest potassium levels.” With that in mind, remember that “fruits and vegetables are potassium-rich, but so are dairy products, seafood, and legumes.”


Impossible and Beyond: How healthy are these meatless burgers?

Impossible Meat

But how do they stack up? It turns out the answer may depend on whether your priorities lie with your personal health or the health of the planet.

I use these products occasionally. I avoid processed soy as it is not that healthy, and limit my intake of processed foods. That is also reflected in my Meal Delivery Service.

The good news: Meatless burgers are a good source of protein, vitamins, and minerals

The protein content of these newer plant-based burgers has been created to compete with beef and poultry gram for gram. Both the Impossible Burger and Beyond Burger have comparable amounts, the former deriving protein mainly from soy and the later from peas.

Both meatless burgers also add vitamins and minerals found in animal proteins — like vitamin B12 and zinc — in amounts equal to (and in some cases, greater than) both red meat and poultry. This is a plus for vegetarians, because these nutrients are typically harder to come by when relying solely on foods from the plant kingdom. Vitamin B12, for instance, is found primarily in animal sources, and strict vegetarians and vegans must get their intake from fortified sources. What’s more, plant compounds such as phytic acid bind to minerals, which can increase requirements of zinc by 50% and may necessitate consuming about two times as much iron. For those who eat at least some animal protein, the vitamin and mineral fortification is less of a selling point.

This doesn’t mean a plant-focused diet is lacking in nutrients. Beans, for instance, are a good source of both zinc and iron. They are also an important protein resource. Black bean burgers are never going to be mistaken for hamburgers, but they are typically a solid choice when it comes to health.

Even though legumes are sourced for protein in the branded meatless options, their health benefits are somewhat blunted by the high degree of processing involved. For instance, moderate amounts of whole soy foods, like edamame (soybeans), have been linked to reduced rates of cancer. This protection is often attributed to isoflavones, a subgroup of plant compounds called flavonoids thought to provide health benefits. Unfortunately, in the case of the Impossible Burger, one serving contains less than 8% of the isoflavones found in one serving of whole soy foods (one serving is roughly a quarter of a block of tofu or 1 cup of soymilk).

Poultry-based burger alternatives, such as turkey burgers, also do not contain significant amounts of protective plant compounds. On the other hand, they offer less saturated fat.

If a lower risk of diseases like cancer and heart disease is your ultimate goal, aim for the kind of veggie burgers that showcase their beans, grains, and seeds front and center. Choose legume-based varieties studded with seeds and whole grains, like brown rice and quinoa.


Shrimp Sweet Potato Cakes with Avocado Salsa

Shrimp and Sweet potato cakes

Serves 2

1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined
2 limes zest
2 tablespoons minced fresh jalapeno
¼ cup finely diced red bell pepper
3 green onions, white and green part, very thinly sliced
2 cups packed shredded sweet potato (this took 1 medium-large sweet potato, peeled and ends trimmed grated on a box grater)
1 T cumin
2 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon kosher salt

Avocado Salsa

1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
1 large ripe avocado, diced
¼ cup red onion, very finely diced
1 red fresno chile, minced
2 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro
2 limes juice
kosher salt

Instructions

Cut shrimp (chopped roughly), and combine with the sweet potatoes, red bell pepper, green onions, jalapeno, cilantro, garlic and salt.

Using clean hands, form 6 equal sized patties from the shrimp and sweet potato mixture. Set the patties aside while you prepare the Avocado Salsa.

For the Avocado Salsa combine all of the ingredients in a medium bowl and gently fold together. Season to taste with kosher salt and set aside.

In a large sauté pan, heat a thin layer of vegetable oil over medium heat. Add a few of the shrimp cakes and cook for about 2-3 minutes each until the bottoms have become golden and crispy.

Flip the cakes and cook another few minutes until the second side is also golden and crispy and the shrimp is cooked to pink.